20th Century Art

 

Synthetic Cubism

Fast Facts

Synthetic Cubism grew out of Analytical Cubism and the experimental nature of Collage. Synthetic Cubism developed through a construction process rather than the analytical process and deconstruction of Analytical Cubism. It is also more decorative and appealing and somewhat easier to interpret.

 
 

 

The Bowl of Fruit, 1912

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

Three Musicians, 1921

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

 

 

The Dream, 1932

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

Fast Facts

“Guernica”, Picasso's major painting of the 1930's, was one of the major paintings of the 20th Century. It is an apocalyptic scene of grotesque and mutilated human and animal figures depicted in tones of black, grey and white. Inspired by The Spanish Civil War, it specifically commemorates the April 26, 1937 three hour aerial bombing and destruction that flattened the Basque town of Guernica. (German bombers were in the service of General Franco and the Spanish Fascists who collaborated with Hitler and Mussolini.) The anti-Franco, Spanish Republicans or the Loyalists side in the Spanish Civil War, commissioned Picasso to paint “Guernica” for exhibition in the Spanish Pavilion of the Paris World's Fair of 1938. Picasso's feelings about the bombing were so difficult to verbalize that he let the painting speak for him.

“Guernica” is regarded as the most intensely powerful anti-war statement (painting)of the 20th Century.

 

Guernica, 1937

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

 

The Skull and Pitcher, 1945

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

 

Las Meninas (after Velazquez), 1957

 
Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
Artchive

To contact the instructor or for comments:

kathleen_grisham@westvalley.edu

 

Go back to the 20th Century Art Categories

Go back to the 20th Century Art Welcome Page

Go Back to the West Valley College Homepage

 
 
 
Kathleen Grisham
Instructor's e-mail address: kathleen_grisham@westvalley.edu
Instructor's homepage:

http://instruct.westvalley.edu/grisham