Home
Getting Started
Course Intro Hist 17B
Course Intro Pol 1
Course Format
Syllabus
Test Drive



Tim Kelly, Ph.D.
Instructor of History and Poli Sci

West Valley College
14000 Fruitvale Ave
Saratoga, CA  95070
(408) 741-2546

E-mail the instructor

history17b_wvc@yahoo.com

poli_sci1_wvc@yahoo.com

 

West Valley College

Fall 2006

ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY
HISTORY 3
Sec. 48561 (M/W 12:30-1:55) Room SS 52

Tim Kelly, Ph.D.
Office Hours:  M/W 2:00-2:30; T/Th 12:30-1:00 and by appt.
Ph: (408) 741-2546

Office SSH1
http://timmer.org/
Tim Kelly's e-mail

 

WELCOME!!!

Introduction to Asian American History examines and compares the diverse historical experiences of major Asian American groups since the mid-nineteenth century.  Topics that this course will cover include:  origins of emigration; the formation and transformation of community and political identity; gender and family life; interethnic and generational conflict; interracial unions; and changing roles of Asian Americans in American society.

GOALS OF THE COURSE

  1. To assess the continuities and changes in the lives of Asian Americans from 1850 to the present.
  2. To understand the contemporary state of Asian American through its historical roots.

Throughout the course, you should be able to:

relate the experiences of Asian Americans to broader trends in U.S., immigration, and ethnic history.
compare and contrast the experiences of different groups of Asian Americans according to such factors as ethnicity, class, gender, generation, and immigration status.
critically analyze primary source documents and writings within their historical context.
critically read secondary sources (historical and other scholarship about Asian Americans) and be able to identify an author's thesis and main points.
write logical and coherent papers and exams with an argument of your own.

REQUIRED TEXTS

All of the following books are required and are at the West Valley College Books (and are also available used on Amazon.com for very low prices).

Ronald Takaki, Strangers From a Different Shore:  A History of Asian America (Back Bay Books, 1998 Revised and Updated)
Yen Le Espiritu, Asian American Panethnicity:  Bridging Institutions and Identities (Temple University Press, 1992)
Joann Faung Jean Lee, Asian Americans:  Oral Histories (New Press, 1992)
Lori Carlson (ed), American Eyes:  New Asian-American Short Stories for Young Adults (Fawcett Juniper, 1994)

Additional reading materials are online at http://timmer.org.  Click on HISTORY 3 from the Home Page and the "Readings" icon on the History 3 page.  It is highly recommended that you print these articles/documents/short passages out ASAP in case of periodic and unforeseen downtime of the web page.  You are responsible to have each of these readings completed by their assigned day on the syllabus.  These readings include:

David Bell, "America's Greatest Success Story," The New Republic, pp. 24-31
Bert Eljera, "The Chinese Beverly Hills"
Gary Okihiro, "Perils of the Body and Mind"
Several online documents and web pages listed below in the syllabus

FILMS

The field of Asian American History is rich in documentary films that probe topics such as identity, assimilation, and racial politics.  We will watch and critically analyze the following films over the semester:

Animal Appetites (WVC Video 2005-18)
Carved in Silence (WVC Video-2005-20)
The Chinese Experience:  Gold Mountain Dreams (not in the library)
Mixed Blood (WVC Video 2005-19)
Sa I Gu (DVD 2006-36)
Slaying the Dragon (WVC Video 2005-17)
Who Killed Vincent Chin? (DVD 2006-37)

Though the films will be available for viewing in the West Valley College Library, it is important that you attend class to see the films and participate in our discussion afterwards.  You will be required to write a one page reaction paper on one film due at the next class meeting after the film has been shown.  Summarize the main points of the film and analyze how it is important in describing the experiences of Asian Americans.

GENERAL CLASS POLICIES

  1. Cell phones and beepers must be turned off in the classroom.
  2. Save this syllabus as evidence for transfer to a four-year institution.
  3. Class participation and COMPLETING THE ASSIGNED READING by the beginning of each topic are essential to passing this course.
  4. Late work is marked down 1/3 of a grade for each day that it is handed in late after the end of class when it is due.
  5. Tutoring is available at no charge at Tutorial Services.  It is provided by qualified, trained, students who have been recommended by the faculty.  Contact Tutorial Services in the Library Building or call 741-2038.
  6. Quizzes may be administered by the Instructor without warning if he feels students are not keeping up with the readings.  Incorrect answers will be deducted from a student's overall participation grade.
  7. Plagiarism/cheating will result in automatic failures for the course and offenders will be referred to the CSSO for disciplinary action.  Familiarize yourself with the campus policy on cheating detailed in the College Catalog under Student Conduct Code, 5.8.19 Policy on Cheating.  (You will find examples of what plagiarism is and how to avoid it at http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html)
  8. West Valley College makes reasonable accommodations for persons with documented disabilities. College materials will be available in alternate formats (Braille, audio, electronic format, or large print) upon request.  Please contact the Disability and Educational Support Program at (408) 741-2010 (voice) or (408) 741-2658 (TTY) for assistance.

CREDIT/NO CREDIT OPTION

Students wishing to take this class with the Credit/No Credit grade option must inform the instructor in writing no later than the end of the SIXTH WEEK.  Requests for this option WILL NOT be accepted after that time.  See the WVC Catalog under "Academic Regulations and Standards" for more information about this option.  Students who wished to be dropped from the course after the first week are responsible for doing this on their own.  I will not do this for you.  If you stop showing up but your name is on my roster at the end of the semester, you will receive an "F" in the class with no opportunities to change this to a "W."

ATTENDANCE POLICY

Regular attendance and punctuality is required and roll will be taken at the beginning of the class.  Tardy students will receive a 1 point reduction from their total grade for each tardy.  More than one absence will constitute a reduction of 2 points for each additional absence.

WEB PAGE

A class web page can be found for History 3 at http://timmer.org.  This page contains the syllabus, lecture outlines, PowerPoint lectures, online readings, and an extensive collection of links covering the topics we discuss in class.  This web page serves as a supplement to the lectures and in-class discussions, not as a substituteNOTE:  As a budget saving measure, lecture outlines will NOT be passed out in class.  STUDENTS SHOULD PRINT OUT THE OUTLINES BEFORE LECTURE.

Course Requirements Grading Policy:  Grades are awarded on a Standard Scale:
1.  One 4-5 page paper
3.  Midterm Exam
4.  Final Exam
5.  Class Participation
6.  Film Review
(250 pts)
(250 pts)
(350 pts)
(50 pts)
(100 pts)
A
B
C
D
F
900 - 1000
800 - 899
700 - 799
600 - 699
599 and below

DATES TO REMEMBER

September 4:
September 8:
September 15:
HOLIDAY
Last Day to Add
Last Day to Drop w/out a "W"
October 11:
November 15:
November 17:
MIDTERM
Paper Due
Last Day to Drop w/a "W"

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULE:  Monday, December 11, 11:50-1:50

 

COURSE OUTLINE


PART I:  COMING TO AMERICA

Week 1

8/28
8/30
Course Overview:  Asians in America
Coming to Gold Mountain:  The Chinese
Readings:  Takaki, Chs 1, 2 (pp. 21-42, 65-75), Ch 3


Week 2

9/4
9/6
LABOR DAY HOLIDAY
FILM:  THE CHINESE EXPERIENCE:  GOLD MOUNTAIN DREAMS
Readings:  Catch-up with Takaki; ONLINE:  California's Anti-Coolie Tax, 1862


Week 3

9/11
9/13
Catch-up
Conflict and Accommodation in Hawaii
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 4


Week 4

9/18
9/20
The Issei:  Japanese in America
Readings:  Takaki, Chs 2 (pp. 42-53), 5


Week 5

9/25
9/27
Urban Lives:  Chinatowns in America
FILM:  CARVED IN SILENCE
Readings:  Takaki, Chs 6; ONLINE:  Angel Island Poetry (http://www.english.uiuc.edu/maps/poets/a_f/angel/angel.htm)


Week 6

10/2
10/4
Koreans and Asian Indians in America
Readings:  Takaki, Chs 2 (pp. 53-65), 7,8


Week 7

10/9
10/11
Filipinos in America
MIDTERM
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 9

 
Week 8

10/16
10/18
World War II:  The Home Front in a Racial War
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 10; ONLINE:  "Exploring Japanese Internment through Film and the Internet" (http://www.jainternment.org/)


PART II:  CURRENT THEMES IN MODERN ASIAN AMERICA 

Week 9

10/23
10/25
The New, New Immigrants:  Post-1965 Immigration
Transplanted Heritage:  Cultural Traditions, Law, and Justice (FILM:  ANIMAL APPETITES)
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 11; Lee, pp. 1-55


Week 10

10/30
11/1
Emerging Common Identity:  The Asian American Movement
Catch-up and Discussion
Readings:  Espiritu, Chs. 1&2; Lee, pp. 99-140


Week 11

11/6
11/8
Interethnic Conflict:  The Case of Monterey Park, California
Anti-Asian Violence in Contemporary America
Readings:  Espiritu, Chs 5-7; ONLINE:  Eljera, "The Chinese Beverly Hills"


Week 12

11/13
11/15
FILM:  WHO KILLED VINCENT CHIN?
Interracial Marriage and Census Conflict  (FILM:  MIXED BLOOD)
Readings:   Carlson, Intro and pp. 1-45; Lee, 173-227;


Week 13

11/20
11/22
Discussion of Assigned Readings
Hollywood and Asian America (FILM:  SLAYING THE DRAGON)
Readings:   Carlson, pp. 46- 136


Week 14

11/27
11/29
The Myth of the Model Minority
NO CLASS
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 12; ONLINE:  David Bell, "America's Greatest Success Story," Okihiro, "Perils of the Body and Mind"


Week 15

12/4
12/6
Racial Conflict in Los Angeles:  Koreans/Latinos/African Americans (FILM:  SA I GU)
Final Thoughts on the State of Asian America
Readings:  Takaki, Ch 13; ONLINE:  Lim, "My Father, Riot Survivor"; Wood, "L.A.'s Darkest Days"

 

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULE:  Monday, December 11, 11:50-1:50