Biology 48 - Home / Announcements - Summer 2017

Date Posted Announcements (in reverse chronological order)
26 July 2017 EXAM #4 (FINAL EXAM) is scheduled for Thursday July 27th @ 9:45am-11:45am in SM 52
Please refer to the study guide for information on exam times and exam composition (i.e. list of topics and proportions). Refer to the lab manual and the lecture outlines for a guide to what you need to know (note: your primary "study guides" are the lecture outlines, lab reports (all) and your notes). Review the text, the lab manual and your notes as study resources.
26 July 2017

Donations Request

Books for Food is requesting donations of textbooks for the Books for Food program. Donated books will be provided to future students in exchange for canned food donations that will be provided to Second Harvest Food Bank. Every donated text saves future students lots of $$$ and leads to food donations to Second Harvest Food Bank. In past semesters Books for Food has lent over 700 books and donated over 5,000 pounds of food! To continue to do so, Books for Food needs more donated books.

If you wish to participate, you may donate your biology textbook (Silverthorn Human Physiology, 7th ed. in good condition) by bringing it to class on the day of the final for 5 extra credit points. I will collect donated books for pick-up by Books for Food. Note: your donation of your textbook(s) would be greatly appreciated but is not required (keeping, reselling, or donating to a friend may be a better choice for you, it is your decision). If you choose to donate your book you will be helping future students. Simultaneously, you benefit from the donations made by others when you get books through the Books for Food program, so here’s your chance to pay it back/forward.

Thanks for your consideration.

24 July 2017

Quiz #8 is scheduled for Wednesday July26th at the end of lab (following the review).

Approx. Breakdown:
10% Renal (see chpts. 19-20 & labs 20-21),
30% Endocrine Physiology (see chpts. 6-7, 22, 23 & Lab 22),
10% Reproductive Physiology (see chpt. 26, app. C),
20% Exercise Physiology / Physical Fitness / Nutrition (see chpts. 4, 22, 25 & Labs 23-24),
30% Comprehensive Review (review notes, lecture outlines, lab reports & old quizzes)

Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.

24 July 2017

NOTICE: Please come appropriately prepared for the Nutrition Lab on Tuesday July 25th:

Nutrition Lab (#24)
This is a fun lab and a nice end to the semester. Please come prepared with the following for completion of the lab activities:

A. Record Your Personal Diet
Prior to attending lab, using the handout provided keep a record of ALL of the foods that you eat during a 24 hour period. Keep track of both what you eat and how much you eat. Keep in mind that it is important to be as accurate and thorough as possible. It is also important that the 24 hour period that you choose reflects a typical day, for the most accurate evaluation of your regular diet.

B. Record Your Activities
During the same 24 hour period keep a record of all of your activities that are greater than your average baseline activity. Make a list of specific and purposeful exercise (i.e. running, swimming, weightlifting) that you completed for the same 24-hour period, using the handout provided. The list is for your personal use, so make it as accurate as you can.

C. Prepare a Pot-Luck Dish
Prepare a pot-luck dish to share with the class. Read through the information in this handout and think about how you can prepare a “healthy” dish. As an example, think about how you could make a nutritionally balanced dish without using large amount of saturated fats. Note: pot luch dishes do not have to be "healthy" but will need to be analyzed for nutritional value.
Regardless of whether you choose to prepare a nutritionally balanced dish or not, be creative! Family favorites and foods from different cultures are always encouraged. You only need to bring enough food to feed 6-10 people. All serving utensils and flatware will be provided, along with juice, tea, and coffee.

Food Allergy Warning: Please make note of whether your dish contains nuts, gluten (wheat), eggs, milk, fish or shell fish, pork, soy, or other ingredients that some individuals may not be able to eat. Use the provided pot luck data form to indicate possible allergens/ restricted ingredients present in your pot luck dish. Add the remaining nutritional data to the form once you complete your analysis in class.

D. Pot-Luck Dish Nutritional Analysis (analysis to be completed in lab)
Bring a list of all of the ingredients used to prepare your pot-luck dish. Use this information to prepare a nutritional analysis of the dish you prepared. You can use the Diet Analysis plus computer program to prepare the nutritional breakdown during lab. Your analysis should include your name, the name of the dish, the ingredients, food allergy warning (see above), serving size, carbohydrate, fat and protein content per serving, and Calories per serving. Post your analysis with the dish you prepared on the back counter.

Use the attached form to record and present your analysis - pot-luck_data.doc or pot-luck_data.pdf

PS - Your contribution to the pot-luck plus nutritional analysis of your pot-luck dish is a "Bonus Point" activity.

20 July 2017

NOTICE: Please come appropriately prepared for theExercise Physiology / Physical FitnessLab (#23) on Monday July 24th, 2017
Please come prepared for exercise (wear non-restrictive/loose fitting clothing and athletic shoes). In addition to the activities in lab, you will also be asked to calculate a target heart rate for cardiorespiratory fitness. To do so you need to establish a resting heart rate (taken when you first wake up in the morning). Please take a pulse first thing after waking in the morning and bring your measured resting heart rate to lab. Some of the lab activities you will participate in include the following:

1. Grip Test for Muscle Strength and Endurance
2. Trunk Flexibility
3. Body Composition (Fat Content - caliper and impedence methods)
4. Harvard Step Test for Aerobic Fitness

20 July 2017 Grades for exam 3 are now complete and are posted here.
19 July 2017 Data from Lab #21 & 22 - Renal & Endocrine Physiology (July 19) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Note: See notes on the "notes" tab of the excel spreadsheets.
19 July 2017 Quiz #7 is scheduled for Thursday July 20th at the start of lecture.
Approx. Breakdown: 55% Digestive Physiology (see chpts 21 & 22 and lab 19), 45% Renal Physiology (see chpts 19 & 20 and labs 20 & 21)
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
17 July 2017

NOTICE: Please come appropriately prepared for lab on Wednesday July 19th (all activities require roughly 24 hours of advanced preparation). Click here to view the sign-up sheet if you have forgotten which activity you are signed up for.

If you are a subject in the RENAL LAB EXERCISES (#21) follow this timeline:

Lab 21 Timeline

A. Be sure to maintain a "normal" state of hydration during the 24 hour period prior to the lab.

B. Stop ALL food and fluid intake 2 hours before the lab begins.

C. Approximately 1 to 1 1/2 hours before the start of the lab, void completely (empty the bladder), noting the exact time.  Discard the urine.  Your bladder should now be empty.  DO NOT void again until the lab begins. This is the control period and will used to establish a preloading urine flow rate and composition.

D. At the start of the lab you will void completely again (be sure to note the exact time), but this time you will save the full volume of excreted urine. Set the collected urine aside, then visit the "bar" to ingest a test volume (fluid load) of either water or isotonic saline.  The test volume to be consumed is 10 milliliters per kilogram of body weight (10 ml / kg).  The test volume should be completely ingested within 10 minutes of voiding (and within the first 10-15 minutes of lab). This need only be done once. 

Get a printable pre-lab handout from the downloads page here.

E. For the remainder of the lab you will not eat or drink. Every 30 minutes you will collect a new urine sample for testing. There are 3 tests: (1) urine volume and time (flow rate), (2) specific gravity, (3) chloride concentration (combined with flow rate).

 

If you are a subject in the ENDOCRINE LAB EXERCISES (#22) follow this timeline:

Lab 22 Timeline

A. Subjects must be fasted for 6 to 12 hours prior to the test and should be in good health. DO NOT eat or drink beverages (other than water or black coffee) during the 6 to 12 hour period prior to the start of the lab.

B. At the start of the lab (prior to consuming the "test" drink) subjects will need to test their blood sugar levels and collect a urine sample. Go to the manufacturers web site to view the tutorial for using the blood glucose meter. Click "How to Test" for a tutorial on using the meter to test a blood sample:

http://www.onetouch.com/onboarding/tour_ultramini

C. After the blood sugar test visit the "bar" to ingest a 296ml test volume (fluid load) of either water or 50 mg Glucose. This test volume should be completely ingested within 5 minutes of the blood test (and within the first 10-15 minutes of lab). This need only be done once.

D. For the remainder of the lab you will not eat or drink. Every 30 minutes you will conduct a new blood glucose test and collect a new urine sample for testing.

Get a printable pre-lab handout from the downloads page here.

NOTE: If you are not present to sign-up as a subject you will default into the Renal Lab (#21) group - please follow the instructions for Lab #21 above.

13 July 2017 Preliminary grades through quiz 6 are posted here.
11 July 2017 Exam #3 is scheduled for Monday July 17th, 2017
Please refer to the study guide for information on exam times and exam composition (i.e. list of topics and proportions). Refer to the lab manual and the lecture outlines for a guide to what you need to know. Review the text, the lab manual and your notes as study resources (note: your real "study guides" are the lecture outlines, the lecture outline study questions, the lab reports (all of them) and your notes).
Grade reports are usually available 11/2-2 weeks following the exam. Check your grade here.
11 July 2017 Quiz #6 is scheduled for Thursday July 13th at the end of lab.
Approx. Breakdown: 20% Immunology (see chpt 24), 45% Cardiovascular Physiology (see chpts 14 & 15 and labs 15-17), 35% Respiratory Physiology (see chpts 17 & 18 and lab 18)
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
10 July 2017 Reminder - the last day to drop is Thursday July 13th, 2017 (not the 15th as it says on your greensheet).
Dropping may be appropriate if you are performing so poorly in the class that you cannot earn a passing grade, or if you have stopped / or plan to stop attending class. Under these conditions dropping may be important for two reasons, (1) it will allow you to register to retake the course (hopefully before it fills) and (2) it will not have a negative effect on GPA calculations (although a "W" will be listed on your transcripts).
Your may file a drop online through the WVCPortal (www.westvalley.edu/wvcportal/) or by visiting the Admissions and Records office (I will not automatically drop you for poor performance).

I will do my best to have updated scores (through quiz #6) posted before the end of the day Thursday for your review. Check your grade here.
6 July 2017 Quiz #5 is scheduled for Monday July 10th at the start of lecture.
Approx. Breakdown: 50% Hematology / Blood (see chpt. 16 & 18 and labs 13 & 14), 50% Cardiovascular System: Heart - thru wed 7/5 (see chpts. 14, 15 and labs 15 & 16)
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
6 July 2017 Term Paper - Final Papers are Due Tuesday July 11th in lab.

Term Papers should range from 3 to 4 pages in length (7 at most) not including the bibliography. All papers must be neatly typed and double spaced with one inch margins and a font size not to exceed the print on this page (12 point). Papers must be proof-read for grammar and spelling. Papers with excessive grammatical and/or spelling errors will not be accepted. Note: Please do not use report covers or include a formal title page.

Your report should consist of the following components (each section should be clearly identified):

ABSTRACT: Briefly summarize the entire paper, no more than 1/2 - 3/4 page in length.

INTRODUCTION: Present the topic/question that will be discussed in the paper and provide a brief physiological background, not more than 1 page in length.

DISCUSSION: In this section you should provide the evidence needed to "answer" to your topic question. Details of your topic should be discussed including a detailed discussion of the physiological phenomena involved. Each of the points and/or ideas that you discuss should be supported by descriptions of the underlying physiological principles. All statements of fact must include a citation of the source in the text of your report (see below).

CONCLUSION: Explain the significance of your findings relative to the original question and effectively answer the original topic question to the degree it is currently known.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Alphabetical listing (by primary author) of all references cited in your report.

Citing sources is very important as is proper citation format. Please see the APA guide available on the library website for more information. Go to the library website (http://www.westvalley.edu/library/ ), select "Research Guides" then "Citation Styles" (or click here for a brief style guide - "APA Style").

See the syllabus for more information on the term paper

Note: Examples of final papers are available for review in the "Key Binder" available during office hours and lab. See grading rubric here.

27 June 2017 Exam #2 is scheduled for Thursday June 29th, 2017
Please refer to the study guide for information on exam times and exam composition (i.e. list of topics and proportions). Refer to the lab manual and the lecture outlines for a guide to what you need to know. Review the text, the lab manual and your notes as study resources (note: your real "study guides" are the lecture outlines, the lecture outline study questions, the lab reports (all of them) and your notes).
Grade reports are usually available 11/2-2 weeks following the exam. Check your grade here.
27 June 2017 Quiz #4 is scheduled for Wednesday June 28th at the end of lab (following the review).
Approx. Breakdown: 75% Neurophysiology (see chpts 6, 8 & 9 and lab 7) and 25% Sensory Physiology (see chpts 9 & 10 and labs 9-11)
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
27 June 2017 Term Paper - Annotated Bibliographies are Due Monday June 31st in lab.

Provide a typed 1-2 page list of, at minimum, 3 scholarly peer reviewed research articles (one must be less than 5 years old). Include a complete and correctly formated bibliographic citation (APA format) for each article. Following each citation include a bullet point list of the information you have obtained from the article that applies to your topic. Hint: this summary should represent your notes of the relevant information provided by the article cited.

Example Journal Citation Format:
Lastname, F.I., & Lastname, F.I. (year). Article title. Journal Name, Volume#(issue#), page range. doi:#if available

Note: The requirement of 3 scholarly peer reviewed articles is a minimum requirement. The articles listed in your annotated bibliography do not have to represent your final list and the minimum requirement is in addition to secondary sources such as the text book. You will need more than 3 reference sources for an above average final paper.

See the syllabus for more information on the term paper
22 June 2017 Comparison data for Lab #7 - Neurophysiology: Action Potential (June 22) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Note: Use this data to supplement for any data that might be missing or for comparison to data you have collected.
22 June 2017 Comparison data for Lab #12 - Muscle Physiology II: Frog (June 20) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Note: Use this data to supplement for any data that might be missing (i.e. nerve stimulation didn't work) or for comparison to data you have collected.
20 June 2017 Quiz #3 is scheduled for Thursday June 22nd at the start of lecture.
Approx. Breakdown: 100% Muscle Physiology (see chpts 11:371-373 & 12 and lab 12)
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
20 June 2017 Term Paper - Topics are Due Wednesday June 21st in lab.
Bring a single typed page with your name, lab time, and list of topics (ranked from most to least desireable). Avoid broad topics (i.e. diabetes) that cannot be effectively covered in the detail required for this paper. Topics should be refined enough to be discussed in detail in a short 3-5 page paper. Instead of the overly broad topic of diabetes, you could focus on one aspect of diabetes (i.e. the mechanism leading to vascular damage in uncontrolled diabetes). It is also highly recommended that you do some preliminary literature review for your potential topics before you commit to them (once commited, there is no going back). See the syllabus for more information on the term paper.
14 June 2017 Exam #1 is scheduled for Thursday June 15th, 2017
Please refer to the study guide for information on exam times and exam composition (i.e. list of topics and proportions). Refer to the lab manual and the lecture outlines for a guide to what you need to know. Review the text, the lab manual and your notes as study resources (note: your real "study guides" are the lecture outlines, the lecture outline study questions, the lab reports (all of them) and your notes).
Grade reports are usually available 11/2-2 weeks following the exam. Check your grade here.
13 June 2017 Data from Lab #6 - Membrane Transport: Diffusion / Osmosis (June 13) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Look for the tabs at the bottom of the excel spread sheet to view different presentations of the data. Note: Two data files are available: data for exercise A -Osmosis and simulated data for exercise B - Simple Diffusion.
13 June 2017 Quiz #2 is scheduled for Wednesday June 14th at the end of lab (following the review).
Approx. Breakdown: 40% Cell Chemistry/Metabolism (see chpt 4 and labs 4 & 5), 60% Membrane Transport (see chpts 2, 3 & 5 and lab 6).
Remember, bring a calculator to all quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
8 June 2017 Data from Lab #4 - Cellular Chemistry: Enzyme Activity (June 8) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Look for the tabs at the bottom of the excel spread sheet to view different presentations of the data. Note: Read the notes (notes tab) regarding editing of the data.
8 June 2017 Data from Lab #3 - Data Presentation and Analysis (June 7) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Note: the posted files are for students that would like more Excel practice. The files include the same file used in class as well as a completed "key" for comparison. You will also find links to software applications you might find useful (i.e. software to read and edit Excel files if you don't have microsoft office, as well as software to read bioinstrumentation (PowerLab) files).
6 June 2017 Quiz #1 is scheduled for Thursday June 8th at the start of lecture
Approx. Breakdown: 33% Introduction / Homeostasis (see chapters 1, 6 & lab 1), 33% Biomolecules (see chapter 2) and 33% combined from the labs on metric system, data analysis & graphing, and concepts of bioinstrumentation (see labs 2, 3 & appendix A)
Remember, bring a calculator to ALL quizzes and exams (you may not use smart phones as calculators), refer to the questions at the end of the lecture outlines and in the lab manual for preparation.
6 June 2017 Note: Lab Manuals are needed for every lab. If you have not purchased your Lab Manual (i.e. you are waiting to see if you can add), you can download and print the first few labs from the course webpage. Please be sure to come to lab prepared: http://instruct.westvalley.edu/norris/48handouts.html#labactivities
6 June 2017 Don't forget that you have two assignments due by Thursday June 8th (assignments can be completed and turned in any time up to the deadline):
1) Complete the Student Information Sheet passed out during the first class meeting (1/2 sheet of paper)
2) Take the Syllabus Quiz (download the quiz from the "downloads" page, print it and answer the questions).
6 June 2017 Data from Lab #1 - Introduction: Homeostasis (June 5) is now available for download from the lab data section of the "Downloads" page. Note: look for the tabs at the bottom of the spreadsheet to view different presentations of the data (pay particular attention to the "Distribution All" tab).
6 June 2017

Biology 48 - Human Physiology - Study Tips:

Time and active repetition are key elements that cannot be overlooked when attempting to learn anything. The more time you spend actively reviewing the material, the more likely it is to stick. Note that this does not mean reading the same thing over and over again. What it means is, going over the same information in a different, thus an active, way (meaning, you have to think about it). Some of what you will learn in physiology will rely on memorization but a larger portion will depend on your understanding concepts so they can be applied. Memorization is primarily a result of rote repetition but rote repetition will not help you understand concepts. Understanding concepts depends on repetition AND active thinking. Ask yourself, "what is this similar to?", "have I ever experienced this?", "what would this look like?", "how does this happen?", "what must happen for X to occur?", "If X changes, what happens to Y" etc.

Example:
1st repetition - read the text assignment - while reading:
(a) think about what you understand and what you don't (mark what you don't understand and ask for clarification).
(b) think about what is important to remember, select that word, sentence or paragraph and highlight it,
The process of actively selecting out and highlighting sections provides a guide for future review, but more importantly the active role increases retention the first time you read it.
(c) think about how the information you are reading fits together, how it collectively explains the function of a cell, tissue, organ, organ system or the human body.
(d) think about experiences you have had that tie in with what you are studying (i.e. when studying cardiovascular physiology - how do your experiences taking a pulse. listening to heart sounds etc. tie into the cardiovascular physiology you are reading about). Establishinjg contect for what you are learning can make it more meaningful.
Note: do all of these things with each study repetition.

2nd repetition - attend lecture / lab and take notes - yes, it is the same material but presented in a new format. The process of taking notes (writing down selected lecture info, not writing everything that is said, is an active process - again you must be thinking about it). This is also an important opportunity to ask questions.

3rd repetition - review the text, the procedures manual and your notes and create a summary sheet (the lecture outlines are designed for this purpose). Again you will be reviewing the same information in an active way (you must think about how to write it in a summary format that is complete and makes sense to you).

4th repetition - participate in the lab activities - this is a chance to experience the concepts described in the text and the lecture. It is the ONLY time when you will be able to work hands on with real specimens, complete experiments and experience the dynamic processes of physiology. Reading about it alone will not work, use the lab time to actively participate in the experience. Its much more memorable that way. The lab is also the best time to get help from the instructor.

5th repetition - answer all of the questions in the lecture outlines and the procedures manual (generally not to be turned in) and practice solving all of the problems and equations. This is good practice and will help identify what you understand and what you don't. Many of the questions can be answered alone or can be answered as a group exercise as they can function as discussion points. This is good practice and will help identify what you understand and what you don't.

6th repetition - FORM STUDY GROUPS! - get together with one or two other students and review all that you have studied (caution: use study groups for review of what you have already studied, NOT as a way to study for the first time). Doing this weekly is ideal, the amount you will need to review will be smaller and more manageable than when study groups are used once just before the exam (although, an exam review is still beneficial).

This will all take a lot of time and effort. Expect to devote time to studying physiology EVERY DAY (close to 10-15 hours or more per week). Don't stop when you think you understand it, keep reviewing until you know it with confidence!

Additional - get assistance - tutoring is available through the tutorial center (http://www.westvalley.edu/services/academic-success/tutorial/) and/or you can ask questions during office hours.

  Spring 2017 physiology students - get your final grades here
 

Welcome to Biology 48 - Human Physiology (5 units)
Lecture 3 units (3 hours); lab 2 units (6 hours)
Prerequisite: Biology 47 and Chemistry 002 or 030A or 001A.
Acceptable for credit: University of California, California State University
C-ID BIOL 120B

Get a Head Start | Student Services | Purchasing Course Books

Physiology is the study of the organ systems of the human body and the physiological principles involved in normal function. Emphasis is upon cellular and organ system function, integration and homeostasis, and regulatory mechanisms. The laboratory includes experiments stressing function of the body systems. Some experiments will be carried out on the students themselves.

 

First Class Meeting - Monday June 5th, 2017 @ 8:00AM
Please DO NOT miss the first days of class! Enrolled students who fail to attend the first days of class may be dropped to make room for students trying to add.

Note: This class includes both lecture and lab everyday Monday through Thursday. Lecture begins at 8:00am followed by lab ending at 12:45pm. Class will meet for the full scheduled lecture and lab on the first day!

Things to do to get a head start:

  1. Check that you are prepared for this course - take the Physiology Pre-Test.
  2. Read over the Syllabus (green sheet) before coming to class.
  3. Read over the Lab Safety Sheet.
  4. Print out and complete the Syllabus Quiz by the due date (Answer the questions after reading the syllabus. You must complete this before the end of the 5th or 6th class meeting).
  5. Read Lab 1 - Introduction: Homeostasis and Appendix A - Metric System in preparation for the first lab meeting. These will be provided as handouts on the first day of class, however, you can download these lab chapters in pdf format to preview (no need to print) from the downloads page.
  6. Purchase your books (see below for purchasing options) and start reading (see the syllabus for required books and reading assignments). Copies of the text and lab manual are also available at the reserve desk in the library.
  7. Learn your way around campus and the Science & Math building - see the campus map

Note: all of the above documents are available for download in pdf format from the "Downloads" page of this website.

 

Student Resources
As a registered student you have a host of resources on campus that are available to you, many free of charge. The following is a partial list (for a complete list please refer to the college catalogue or the Student Services section of the college web page).

Admissions and Records General Support Services Campus Facilities
Application for admission Counseling Center Bookstore
WVC Portal (registration) Health Services Library
  Financial Aid  
Academic Support Services  
CANVAS Learning Management System (LMS)
Tutorial Services  
Disability & Educational Support Program (DESP)  
Extended Opportunity Programs & Services (EOPS)  

 

Purchasing Course Books:
Several options are available to you.

West Valley Campus Bookstore: You can Purchase all of the books listed in the greensheet directly from the bookstore located on West Valley campus. The bookstore also provides an online service in case you do not want to go there in person (WVC bookstore).

NOTE: Books are not accessible on open bookshelves in the bookstore. To purchase books at the bookstore, students must have a printed schedule of their classes – course and section numbers. Bookstore employees use the printed schedule to pull books for the students; mobile devices – phones, tablets – cannot be used. Advice for students: Print your class schedule at home, bring it with you to the bookstore. Alternately - computers and a printer should be available at a kiosk in the Campus Center for students who need to print their schedule. Best Option: order your books on-line, pick up at the bookstore – no lines! West Valley College Bookstore page on our web site: http://westvalley.edu/bookstore/

Note: bookstore profits help fund the campus center - purchasing your books from the campus bookstore will help support the campus center.

Ordering online (new or used): I am aware that book prices are exorbitant. If book prices are out of your budget there may be alternatives to buying new copies. One option to save money is to order books online from discount suppliers. The down side is that it can take several days, or possibly weeks, for your books to arrive depending on the vendor, and you will need the "required books" on the first day of class. Consequently, unless you have ordered your books several weeks in advance, this option may better serve you for the purchase of the "optional books" listed in your syllabus. The following online vendors may prove to be good resources:


Other Local Bookstores: A less commonly successful but useful alternate is to search the local new and used bookstores in the area (including other campus bookstores) for the books you need. I have periodically found useful resource books at a significant discount at used bookstores.


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